The 21 March 2019 Supermoon, or the more common name, Perigee Syzygy of the Sun, Earth and Moon system.

News from the Galactic Centre

Most models of the Moon orbiting the Earth depict its orbit as being circular but we know from Kepler’s Laws that celestial bodies orbit one another in an ellipse rather than a circle. What this means is that sometimes the Moon is closer to the Earth than at other times in its orbit. When this is combined with the Moon being a Full Moon then it’s commonly known as a Supermoon. The last of these occurrences for this year is tonight, the 21 March 2019. At 8:30pm the Moon was 360,242 km away, about the distance it takes light to travel in 1.2 seconds. This is the third Supermoon this year, so basically all of the full Moons this year have been Supermoons.

By comparison the full Moon in August last year was 399,892 km away (1.33 light seconds) and its diameter appeared to be 29.9 arc minutes. Compare that…

View original post 312 more words

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s